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Former Alabama governor gets 6½ years for bribery, fraud

By Terry Frieden, CNN
August 3, 2012 -- Updated 2244 GMT (0644 HKT)
Former Alabama Gov. Don Siegelman is to serve 78 months behind bars, plus three years of supervised release and a fine.
Former Alabama Gov. Don Siegelman is to serve 78 months behind bars, plus three years of supervised release and a fine.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Don Siegelman convicted in scheme in which CEO paid $500,000 for board seat
  • He was also found guilty in alleged pay-to-play scheme involving another businessman
  • He served less than a year in prison before being released on bail in 2008
  • He requested a new trial but was denied and resentenced

(CNN) -- Former Alabama Gov. Don Siegelman was denied a new trial Friday and resentenced to 6½ years in prison for his role in bribery, conspiracy, fraud and obstruction of justice, the Justice Department announced.

At a hearing Friday in a federal courtroom in Montgomery, District Judge Mark Fuller said Siegelman would serve the 78 months behind bars, plus receive three years of supervised release and a $50,000 fine.

Siegelman's contentious prosecution included a jury verdict of guilt on seven charges in 2006. An appeals court threw out two of the charges but upheld five counts, and the Supreme Court refused to hear his appeal.

Siegelman served less than a year in prison before he was released on bail in 2008 after the appellate court tossed two of the charges.

But on Tuesday, he asked for a new trial.

"The District Court reviewed and denied all of Siegelman's various claims for a new trial prior to his resentencing (Friday)," the Justice Department said.

Siegelman stands convicted of bribery, conspiracy and honest services mail fraud arising from a scheme in which HealthSouth CEO Richard Scrushy paid $500,000 for a seat on the state regulatory board governing HealthSouth.

Siegelman was found guilty of obstruction of justice stemming from an investigation of an alleged pay-to-play scheme with another Alabama businessman.

"The outcome of this case reflects the unflagging commitment of the Department of Justice to hold public officials accountable for corruption," Assistant Attorney General Lanny Breuer said in a statement.

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