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High-tech clothes that make cocktails, turn see-through

The DareDroid is a biomechanic cocktail-making dress on display at the "Technosensual" exhibition in Vienna. Sensors around the wearer's neck detect when someone approaches and allow the system to dispense a cocktail. If they move into the wearer's personal space, the dress stops dispensing the drink. The DareDroid is a biomechanic cocktail-making dress on display at the "Technosensual" exhibition in Vienna. Sensors around the wearer's neck detect when someone approaches and allow the system to dispense a cocktail. If they move into the wearer's personal space, the dress stops dispensing the drink.
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'DareDroid' by Modern Nomads (MoNo)
'Bubelle' by Royal Philips Electronics
'Intimacy 2.0' by Studio Roosegaarde
Taiknam Hat
'Circuit Dress' by Nicky Assmann
'Smoke Dress'
'Body Speaker' by Karina van Heck
'Paparazzi Lover' by Ricardo O'Nascimento
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STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Vienna exhibition showcases fashion incorporating cutting-edge technology
  • "TECHNOSENSUAL" aims to show how technology can enhance fashion
  • Smoke-billowing frocks and hats that detect radio waves are among objects on display

(CNN) -- Featuring risque-looking dresses that dispense cocktails and frocks that billow smoke, the clothes on show at the "Technosensual" exhibition could be mistaken for an auction of Lady Gaga's more bizarre outfits.

But it's hoped that the designs on display at Quartier21 in the MuseumsQuartier, Vienna, Austria, will pique the interest of both fashionistas and tech heads.

The Bubelle dress, designed by Lucy McRae for the Dutch electronics firm Philips, reveals the wearer's emotional state using biometric sensors that trigger different light and color displays.

Another dress, "Paparazzi Lover," is perfect for Hollywood starlets -- incorporating 62 LED lights that light up when the dress detects photographers' flash bulbs -- reminding crowds just who the star is, according to its creator Ricardo O'Nascimento.

"(The exhibition) proves that intelligent fashion has long gone beyond being a vision of the future ..." says MuseumsQuartier director Christian Strasser.

Other highlights include "Taiknam Hat," which detects radio waves and responds by activating motors that move feathers adorning the hat, and "Intimacy 2.0" -- a dress that becomes increasingly transparent based on the wearer's heart rate, according to its creators, Studio Roosegaarde.

A series of lectures, performances and workshops have also been organized for the exhibition, which runs until the beginning of September.

Ivana Kottasová contributed to this report.

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