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Wind blows players and schedule off course at Women's British Open

September 14, 2012 -- Updated 1645 GMT (0045 HKT)
The wind blew hard on day two of the Women's British Open at Hoylake, forcing officials to abandon play
The wind blew hard on day two of the Women's British Open at Hoylake, forcing officials to abandon play
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Play abandoned after one hour 18 minutes on day two of Women's British Open
  • High winds at the Royal Liverpool Golf Club make play impossible
  • Round two will take place on Saturday; Rounds three and four on Sunday, weather permitting

(CNN) -- Strong winds curtailed action at the Women's British Open after just over an hour's play on Friday.

Play began at 7 a.m. local time on the Royal Liverpool Golf Club at Hoylake, but gusts of wind up to 60 mph soon made conditions unplayable with balls falling off tees and moving on the greens.

Officials stopped play at 8.18 a.m. and play was abandoned for the day at 11 a.m. with all day two starters' scores being declared null and void.

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Co-overnight leader Ryu So-Yeon from South Korea was one of the 36 players who started their second rounds before play was stopped.

America's Michelle Wie, who opened with a three-over par round of 75, was another who teed off early, braving the breezy conditions.

"When I arrived at the course at 5 a.m. it was raining sideways. I've never seen anything like it," Wie said.

"It was fairly sheltered by the tents when we set off but by the time we got to the 12th it was clearly unplayable," added Wie, who started at the 10th hole on Friday.

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"The ball would barely stay on the tee and they were moving all over the greens. When you have to call a rules official six times on a green then you know it's bad.

"I'm so tall I felt like a flagpole. I thought I might fall over when I tried to hit the ball and it was definitely the right call."

After a meeting of the Championship Committee, it was decided that round two will take place on Saturday with the final 36 holes being played on Sunday, weather permitting.

It was also agreed that the halfway cut will be reduced from the top 65 and ties to the top 50 and ties.

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