Skip to main content

Sensational Shin wins women's British Open

September 16, 2012 -- Updated 1948 GMT (0348 HKT)
South Korea's Shin Jiyai also won the women's British Open in 2008.
South Korea's Shin Jiyai also won the women's British Open in 2008.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • South Korea's Shin Jiyai wins the women's British Open by nine shots
  • The former world No. 1 also won the tournament in 2008
  • Shin's compatriot Park Inbee finished second on level par
  • American 2010 U.S. Open champion Paula Creamer finishes third

(CNN) -- South Korea's Shin Jiyai carded a final-round 73 to seal an emphatic nine-stroke victory at the women's British Open.

Players were forced to play both the third and fourth rounds on Sunday after adverse weather conditions at the Royal Liverpool Golf Club had made play impossible on Friday.

Former world No. 1 Shin finished nine-under par for the tournament, with her closest rival, compatriot Park Inbee, finishing level par through 72 holes. American 2010 U.S. Open winner Paula Creamer was third on one over.

After carding a course record 64 on Saturday, Shin started the day five shots clear of the field.

Is Olazabal ready for Ryder Cup?
Chinese golfers prepare for Rio

Australia's Karrie Webb reduced the gap to three strokes during the third round, played early on Sunday, but she was unable to prevent Shin clinching a second British Open triumph following her win in 2008.

The 24-year-old's success means all four of this year's majors have been won by Asian players.

Sun-Young Yoo, also of South Korea, took the Kraft Nabisco Championship, while China's Shanshan Feng won June's LPGA Championship. South Korean Na Yeon Choi clinched the 2012 U.S. Open.

Teenage sensation Lydia Ko, who was born in South Korea but is a New Zealand national, stormed to her first LPGA Tour title last month, with much expected of the 15-year-old at Hoylake.

But the amateur endured a torrid final round and finished nine over for the tournament, in a six-way tie for 17th position.

Level with Ko was American rising star Lexi Thompson. The 17-year-old carded a level-par 72 for the final round.

One shot ahead of Ko and Thompson in a four-way tie for 13th was Michelle Wie. The two-time LPGA Tour winner closed out with a seven-over par 79.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
April 22, 2014 -- Updated 1238 GMT (2038 HKT)
Eagles may be thin on the ground for most golfers at the Bear Trace course at Harrison Bay. But up in the treetops, it's a different matter.
April 18, 2014 -- Updated 1754 GMT (0154 HKT)
When someone tells you to go jump in a lake, sometimes it's best to take their advice. "I've never been so scared," says golfer Pablo Larrazabal.
Bubba Watson is the Masters king, but can he win a major away from Augusta? Living Golf's Shane O'Donoghue has the lowdown.
April 15, 2014 -- Updated 1412 GMT (2212 HKT)
Arnold Palmer
Arnold Palmer won his first major at Augusta, played there with the U.S. President and made a record 50 consecutive Masters appearances.
April 10, 2014 -- Updated 1202 GMT (2002 HKT)
He is remembered for designing one of the world's most famous golf courses, but the man behind Augusta died pleading to be paid.
April 10, 2014 -- Updated 1004 GMT (1804 HKT)
Take a trip around Augusta. From Eisenhower's toppled tree to the fiendishly-difficult Amen Corner, the Masters' home venue has it all.
April 8, 2014 -- Updated 1204 GMT (2004 HKT)
He's been mistaken for Tiger Woods' ball-boy, but that won't be the case when amateur star Matt Fitzpatrick tees off at the Masters.
April 4, 2014 -- Updated 1228 GMT (2028 HKT)
2012 Masters Champion Bubba Watson shows us how to hit the long ball.
April 3, 2014 -- Updated 1827 GMT (0227 HKT)
CNN's Shane O'Donoghue meets Billy Payne -- the chairman of Augusta National Golf Club.
April 3, 2014 -- Updated 1739 GMT (0139 HKT)
Shane O'Donoghue meets Ben Crenshaw who won his first of two Masters thirty years ago this month.
March 27, 2014 -- Updated 1300 GMT (2100 HKT)
They carry a bag for a living but these men can bring home six-figure incomes. Welcome to the world of a caddy.
CNN's Alex Thomas welcomes golf opening itself up to women, but questions the motives behind the decision.
ADVERTISEMENT